New Drawing and Meditation: Sophia “Prodigal”

Sophia "Prodigal" drawing by nakedpastor David Hayward

Sophia “Prodigal” drawing by nakedpastor David Hayward

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I always liked the story of the prodigal son.

Well, here’s the prodigal woman.

(May I remind you that this story of Sophia, already published in my book, The Liberation of Sophia on Amazon? It is the story of my inner self, my “soul” so to speak, my Jungian anima, and it’s journey from bondage into freedom. Sophia means wisdom in Greek, and it took years for my inner wisdom to finally break free from oppression and find its courage to live courageously and independently.)

Sophia is me.

Sophia was too familiar with living under authority. For years she complied, conformed, and conceded… always congenial. It was a safe and secure life.

Then, suddenly, she had enough! She took what she could and left the rest behind.

Sophia became a prodigal. No, she made herself a prodigal!

Sophia experiences the world’s violence against her… against the feminine, against wisdom, against women. She discovers the truth of Margaret Atwood’s words: “Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.” She lives in a world where some feel entitled to grab her by the pussy, to rape her with their eyes and flesh and words. It doesn’t feel safe to nurture the feminine.

Now all the Old Testament passages where wisdom is assaulted and left to die make sense to her.

The Patriarchy is not friendly or fair to all its subjects.

My experience is that the anima, like Sophia, is unequal to the animus. Animus rules! Animus loves power and wielding it. Animus loves dominating, and especially dominating the anima. Animus loves control and getting the upper hand. My experience is that few people understand the equal importance and value of anima and animus. Few people nurture both, so anima usually loses. This is my experience.

This image does not look hopeful… surrounded by men who are pigs, trampling her pearls under their feet and tearing her asunder.

But! Nevertheless, she will eventually come into her own wisdom, her own strength, her own courage. She will come to a clear sense of herself. In spite of the severe opposition, she will be herself.

And filled with the power she empowers herself with, she will restore herself.

This may not change the world she lives in, but it will certainly change the way she lives in it.

Which may change the world she lives in.

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2 Responses

  1. Caryn LeMur says:

    You chose the word “Prodigal”, that is, someone that returns home.

    In the case of lovely Sophia, home to pigs.

    The cartoon has bothered me… and now I know why… there is no home for an older woman, who is losing beauty, to return to.

    You can only risk being a female prodigal, and returning ‘home’, when you are still young enough to be desired.

    To be treated poorly by pigs is sad… but to not be even perceived… is a different tragedy.

  2. Oh my yes. Thanks for sharing that perspective Caryn. I’ve heard from quite a few people that this drawing bothers them. They’re not angry I drew it. It just stirs something up in them that is very uncomfortable. I haven’t heard this angle yet, and yes, it is tragic.