Never Give Up! All It Takes is One Stone!

"Just One Stone" cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

“Just One Stone” cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

All it takes is one stone properly placed.

I like the story of David and Goliath for two reasons:

1. It’s an encouragement to us that with courage, persistence, and good aim, we can bring down giants.
2. It’s a warning to giants that no matter the size of your ego or power, you always have a weakness.

I think this story is important today.

This doesn’t mean I want to take down the church. This doesn’t mean I want to take down the government.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with giants. It’s just that if they decide to become bullies they become very dangerous.

It DOES mean I want to take down the evil manifestations of them.

GET THIS CARTOON!

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17 Responses

  1. Brigitte says:

    The Chinese government wants to take down the church. The Korean government wants to take down the church. All Islamic governments want to take down the church. All anarchists and communists want to take down the church, plenty of philosophers and professors want to take down the church. Also lots of Jews, judging by the Internet, would love to take down the church. It’s kingdom is not of the world, and that is why you can’t take it down, even if steeples are falling. The church is not Goliath.

  2. It has often behaved like Goliath to me.

    And Brigitte: what does it matter if the government tries to bring down the church by violence OR, as I believe is happening in the USA, by pandering? Both attempt to neutralize the independent spirit of the church.

  3. Brigitte Mueller says:

    Christians and others with conservative moral and economic, or other, views, are citizens of the country. They can vote to the best of their conscience if they like. In a democracy, and under law that applies to all, you cannot just expect your own will to be done.

    Let’s take abortion. It is seen as one if these inaniable rights for some. Excuse others! — if does not follow for many people that killing your off-spring is natural or desirable. More desireable would be a society that values families and has laws that help and protect them. But just saying that calls up cries of “patriarchy”. It is completely insane.

  4. Brigitte says:

    Christians and others with conservative moral and economic, or other, views, are citizens of the country. They can vote to the best of their conscience if they like. In a democracy, and under law that applies to all, you cannot just expect your own will to be done.

    Let’s take abortion. It is seen as one if these inaniable rights for some. Excuse others! — if does not follow for many people that killing your off-spring is natural or desirable. More desireable would be a society that values families and has laws that help and protect them. But just saying that calls up cries of “patriarchy”. It is completely insane.

  5. Brigitte says:

    And it reads like you white-wash international violence against Christians.

  6. I certainly recognize violence against Christians throughout the world. What this cartoon is about is the violence done by the church against people in the world, including its own Christians, a this one person’s resistance against it.

  7. Caryn LeMur says:

    I am impressed that you, David, are never giving up on trying to change the institutional church.

    Here in the USA (I really don’t know Canadian churches), there are many churches that see their own self as always correct, that they are part of the kingdom of heaven but desire the political power on earth.

    I know… Jesus said otherwise, or else his servants would fight.

    But… scripture is not my point in this particular post.

    Rather, I am concerned about the church culture that will overrun even a contrary thought, and beat that thought down to nothing…. they will compare you to the negative aspects of communists, anarchists, Muslims, and Jews… offer strawman arguments… and then imply that your view is therefore also ‘insane’.

    The church culture has not even trained its people to have a discussion without insult.

    If this is how they plan to win people to Christ, then I think they have redefined love to be rude confrontation and ridicule.

    What do you see, David, in the church institution that is worth saving? May I ask?

  8. Brigitte says:

    I know Caryn that you think yourself the most compassionate person out there, but really, you are merciless and you don’t make sense.

  9. Brigitte says:

    I forgot to mention that the Indian Hindu Nationalist government attacks Christians, that the lowest class has become eligible for education, but NOT the Christians of the lowest class. I also forgot to mention ISIS that actually carries out crucifixions, beheadings and such monstrosities, as indicated in the holy Koran specifically for unbelievers and those who fall away from the faith, but that we have been told about.– I am one lone grandmother complaining here, speaking up, where all others have been driven out. And I, too, am maligned constantly by the people of love.

    NP is taking aim at a church in which he does not believe. No church is good, he has told us before. So he is not a reformer. The Bible is not literally true. Christ is… We are not sure. So whatever it is he affirms is his own personal choice. He has the freedom to believe what he wants, but he does not have the power to impose his views onto a world-religion and then make himself the very definition of Christianity.

  10. Brigitte: You assume to know exactly what Caryn thinks (of herself) and what I think (of the church). I made it clear in my post, so I thought, that I am not against the church but against it when it turns into a bully.

    Caryn: The church’s GREATEST asset and value is it’s gift of being able to gather people together in community. Of course, this is true of most great religions.

  11. Caryn LeMur says:

    David: hmmmmm… a good point. The church does sometimes create a space for community.

    I live in a home built circa 1835. Back then, the church was the center of community (so I have read).

    Men and women worked 6 days a week, and most often in the very local farming/fishing area. To travel the 20 miles to the nearest town was quite an undertaking.

    However, the local church gave them the focal point for meeting eligible men and women for marriage, a place to honor god with an hour set aside to acknowledge him, and a place to visit after the sermon (apparently, it was quite a social time… the ‘church’ was the main event of that Sunday… but the ‘church’ meant much more than a morning drive-by).

    People even had their special clothes they wore to church back then. I have found no evidence of a ‘food bank’, but imagine that the poor were helped in some way back then. Our area is historically Catholic.

    It appears to have been quite a community event.

    What other choice for community existed back then? — well, there were dance halls, and the like… but that is where all the ‘bad’ people went.

    And the Protestants? Well, they were on the next peninsula of land. So, apparently in 1835, we had the church also involved in slowly ensuring its ‘own’ people survived economically…and each side pushed ‘the others’ out.

    Fast forward to 2016…. I can drive to any church of my choosing… easily go that 20 miles to town. I have visited the Wesleyan church there… interesting architecture by the way… and noticed no community before the ‘service’ and none after the ‘service’.

    It was a drive-by experience.

    I get my ‘community of the heart’ amongst the closest of friends via email messages. Some of them, I have not seen in years… yet, our hearts are close. This would be similar to the confessional community that Brigitte and I discussed in other posts.

    I get my ‘economic community’ via the Intranet connecting me to my co-workers in India and areas of the US.

    I get my ‘gardening community’ via the Internet, and YouTube.

    I get my ‘spiritual community’ via TLS.

    Once a year, Bonnie and I host the ‘Street and Friends Party’ for our neighbors. So that way, besides saying ‘hi’ to our physically close neighbors, we also become a social center once a year. We also tend to hire our neighbors for work (electrical, home repair, and the like)… because that is another way we help ‘community’.

    With all these choices available…. then, David, I ask ‘how do you think the church can compete in the ‘community market’ in any meaningful manner’?

  12. Caryn LeMur says:

    Brigitte: yes, it is hard to grow old. I hear you on that point.

    Soon, I will be 61 years old. It is interesting to see how the older worker is thought to be a lesser contributor to society, to the workplace, to the family, and even to the church.

    Oh, I live as if there is no prejudice. I have to do this… or I would just fall into depression.

    I met a man the other day, filled with joy and energy, and probably 70 years old. I would have hired him in an instant, so to speak. He radiated everything that the workplace needs.

    I think I shall try to emulate him.

  13. Well Caryn, as you know, The Lasting Supper is a community that I think models possibilities. I founded and facilitate it based on my experience and living research as the pastor of a local community here until I left the ministry in 2010. If this is possible locally and online, as is my experience, then I hope to see it replicated.

  14. Caryn LeMur says:

    David: I hear you. However, that said, ‘community of the heart’ such as we have within TLS, requires a radical departure from the ‘community of correction’, which is the basis for many institutional churches, which in turn, creates the ‘bullying’ we have discussed in this and other posts.

    To avoid the bullying within a ‘community of correction’, people ultimately depart or become ‘true believers’, and ultimately resort to hatred, name calling, insults, and so forth – which insulates them within a safe cocoon of ‘pseudo-community’ – that is, a community based on ‘enforcement of sameness’.

    Let me think some more about this discussion.

    And… have a wonderful day-before-American-Turkey-Day… lol.

    Cheers! Caryn

  15. Community of correction can’t work. I mean, you can have community and you can have correction but they can’t be essentially both.

    Happy thanksgiving! Canadians already had theirs!

  16. Caryn LeMur says:

    Hmmmmm…. David, you said you encountered ‘community’ within a previous church.

    Given that a church is often a ‘community of correction’, how did you establish ‘community’ within that church?

    It seems that you are saying that you found a way to allow a plant to bloom in a very harsh environment… or, that only a particular type of community-plant grew there?

  17. Well… for my last church, which was a Vineyard… I wouldn’t have called it a community of correction. We were a community… and nurtured the same values as TLS… mutual respect.