the one reason why it is so difficult to change your mind is the same reason why you should

"Change Your Mind" cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

“Change Your Mind” cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

When you change your mind, everything changes.

This is why it is so seemingly impossible. I say seemingly because the mind will make it seem as though it is not only impossible to do, but suicidal.

The brain’s “job one” is to protect the organism. It is all about security.

This means preserving its comforts. It means not dying to what it already knows. The renewing of the mind is like a death and resurrection. That’s the deal! The mind says no deal and foregoes renewal.

But this is the only way your life can change. It begins in the mind.

For those of us who have changed our beliefs, it is a radical changing of the mind. I was in the church for decades, and my mind had grown accustomed to its looks. But when my mind changed, everything changed!

I left the ministry. I left the church. I lost friends. I lost my career and income. I lost so much that it was really a kind of death. But in losing all that, I also found a new life that I wouldn’t trade. I’m learning how to live with this new mind. It’s still very young. Like a beginner’s mind.

It’s actually fun, like a butterflies-in-my-gut adventure! Join me.

If you know what I’m talking about, or want to know, come join our online community The Lasting Supper and you’ll find out. We help people learn how to live their new lives post-changing-of-mind. Click here to look into it!

Also, read the story of Sophia… about a woman who changed her mind and therefore changed her life! It’s actually my story, but told through the Sophia metaphor! Click here to check out the book!

SHOP

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11 Responses

  1. Excellent! I’ve never link dropped here before, and that’s not my mo, but a couple weeks ago I wrote a post about the Matrix saying very much the same thing. I called it “taking the red pill” http://www.christianevolution.com/2014/07/red-pill-christianity-come-and-see.html

  2. Sabio Lantz says:

    Nice ! I’m surprised that you didn’t put a picture of a generic spouse up there. Some folks change those without realizing that it is their own mind that is the problem.

    You said: “… I lost so much that it was really a kind of death.”

    I totally understand. In fact, I value those little deaths — I wrote about it here in “Mini-Deaths”:
    http://triangulations.wordpress.com/2009/07/26/mini-deaths/

  3. I did think of a spouse but there would have been the danger of that being misinterpreted.

  4. nexar says:

    I’m glad that you didn’t include ‘spouse’ because all the other stuff you’ve got there are ‘things’.

    Changing a ‘spouse’ is the equivalent of changing ‘mind’,’church’,etc. Completely different IMHO.

  5. Donna says:

    Wayne Dyer says, “When you change the way you look at things, you change the way things look.” I used that as my screen saver for many years when I was still in the work force. It helped. (I also used “Is this the hill I want to die on?” but that’s a whole other comment stream!)

  6. Tracey Cullers says:

    As always, I’m impressed by who reads your thoughts, David. Nice blog on mini-deaths, and I like the, “Is this the hill I want to die on?” comment. It seems like you enjoy being a springboard. Thanks!

  7. Thanks guys!! Really 🙂

  8. R Vogel says:

    Great post! Remind me a lot of some things I have read that equate the ‘principalities & powers’ referred to in christian scripture not to nefarious spiritual bogeymen, but to this kind of dehumanizing system given rise by the ‘spiritual’ aspect of institutions (cultural, national, and religious) becoming internalized.

  9. R Vogel says:

    Am I the only one who giggles when he reads ‘Little Deaths’?

  10. Melody says:

    “The renewing of the mind is like a death and resurrection.” That’s what it feels like. On the one hand, I sometimes do feel like I’m losing much, the security of my faith, the friendship of a familiar God…. on the other hand, I am gaining so much too… mostly freedom and a new-found (or recovered and resurfaced) identity. I find myself thinking back to my childhood and all the thoughts and opinions I smothered for the sake of church and family and how I did know who I was but was simply too afraid to be… It’s is like I am finding her back and slowly becoming couragous enough to become her (as she was and wanted to be). It is both scary and great 🙂

  11. Oh Melody that reminds me of my Sophia story so much. Right on!